June 2014

There’s jetlag. And there’s Shanghai jetlag.

I just spent 5 days in this city I love.

A 12-hour-flip from the Miami time of my home.

5 days of dislocation.

Getting sleepy at inopportune times. In bed and tired as hell and wide awake. Riding taxis through miles of high-rise canyons blurred by rain. The gasped horror of the swimming-pool attendant as I slide into the water without a bathing cap.
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I gave my friend Suzanne a document to review the other day. And I requested some very specific feedback.

I will read it with INTENTION and ATTENTION, Suzanne declared.

Suzanne was in the midst of a hectic day. Conference calls, juggling a multitude of projects, preparing for a road trip.

Intention and attention. The writer in me is tickled by the alliteration. The words alone bring me joy. More significantly, Suzanne’s answer offered instant comfort. (more…)

I spent 9 days in Cuba last month.

Many stories to tell.

Yes, I engaged in some of the expected activities. Strolled through Havana Vieja, retracing Ernest Hemingway’s steps. Listened to infectious live music every day. Indulged in a slew of sumptuous meals prepared in the home-grown paladares, beacons of a nascent Cuban entrepreneurialism.

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Hopped into my car last Wednesday and headed across Alligator Alley to Naples, on the West Coast of Florida.

6 of us gathered to break bread and kick around some ideas. Ted Coine, Suzanne Daigle, Shawn Murphy, Susan Mazza, Mark Babbitt. And me. Cherished business colleagues. Becoming friends.

This is the important part.

We came together because we wanted to. No other reason.

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Over lunch on Thursday, Leandra Campbell said to me: I use the Pomodoro Technique.

Leandra has worked in my firm for two years now. I had never heard her speak of the Pomodoro Technique. I was intrigued. Leandra explained:

In the Pomodoro Technique, you work in 25-minute intervals. These intervals are called pomodori. After one pomodori, you take a 5-minute break. After 4 pomodori, you give yourself a longer break of 15-30 minutes.

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People help us all the time.

They help us in entirely unexpected ways. Little ways, big ways. Tangible, intangible ways.

They help us with a fleeting comment. A kind smile. A word of encouragement. A referral. An unexpected action on our behalf.

They help us in ways they never know. They don’t know because we do not let them know.

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